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Pace Undoing Of Derby Favourite

Jockeys are responsible for pace

‘That was slower than slow!’

Milnerton trainer Greg Ennion told the Sporting Post on Sunday morning that the Cape Crawl had followed him all the way up the Garden Route to Fairview where his East Cape Derby favourite Cedar Man, a genuine staying type, had to contend with a ‘600m dash’.

A disappointed Ennion said that his charge, who had travelled well and was fit enough to win the race, may as well have stayed at home in his box.

Cedar Man chases Pacific Chestnut home in the Kenilworth Cup (Pic – Chase Liebenberg Photography)

“Most horses go as fast or slow as they are instructed by the rider. The blame for the dawdle lies squarely with the jockeys. Down south we call it the Cape Crawl. Maybe the racing public must suggest a name for the Fairview equivalent.”

He said that plan B was, in the event of no pace, was to go to the front and let Cedar Man bowl along there.

“He stays well. He could have outstayed the majority of the field had it been a true test. But this Derby was a sprint. Our jockey unfortunately didn’t go to the front and take the initiative.”

Cedar Man ran a 6,05 length fifth.

St Vladimir won in a time of 151,88 secs on Saturday.

His stablemate American Landing won unextended in 2018 in a time of 150,61 secs.

Dorset Noble won in a time of 151,19 secs in 2017.

Ennion confirmed that Gold Cup plans were still on track and that Cedar Man would travel to Durban on Monday.

“This race taught us nothing. But he pulled up well. So we will continue with the plan. Well done to the winning connections and thanks to the Fairview guys for the hospitality.”

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19 comments on “Pace Undoing Of Derby Favourite

  1. IAN says:

    Presumably Lerena won’t be riding Cedar Man in the Gold cup….?

  2. Armchair Jockey says:

    I’ve never understood this issue of the pace being too slow but then I am just an armchair critic! Surely a professional a jockey is capable of judging what pace his horse is likely to be best suited to and placing his mount accordingly to give it every chance. Or do jockeys, like their lucky punter counterparts, just pick a spot in the bundle and hope like hell it works out at the end? Perhaps some armchair experts can enlighten me!

  3. Pops says:

    The P E Breeze?

    1. Editor says:

      Mmmm..not bad Pops

  4. WILLIAM MILKOVITCH says:

    Oh, that’s funny Pops. I need a good laugh, just as Armchair Jockey’s observation provided.

  5. Rian says:

    My Grandaughter of 11started picking them from about 5 and her strike rate was very good with fav names and numbers, but since she has twigged on to the betting her stats are really bad.
    Hope that helps Armchair and good one Pops

  6. Kuben says:

    It is not the job of the other horses/jockeys to ensure a pace that will play into your hands. They ran the race in a manner that favours them. This just sounds like sour grapes. PS I backed St Vladimir ????

  7. Cecil Pienaar says:

    Nope, Gavin will ride Sunshine Silk in The Gold Cup. Mr Woodruff has a good stayer here..

  8. gavin says:

    another dreadful ride by lerena

  9. Art says:

    Agree 100% with armchair jockey ,if the jocks were good enough they would be setting fractions for themselves .Seems they are not good enough .Maybe an experienced trainer can assist us here.

  10. Ian Jayes says:

    Good jockeys are excellent judges of pace. All any jockey can do, is put the horse in the right position and make his run at the right time, if the horse can win, it will then do so. While horses and not jockeys win races, jockeys can help them to do so, or hinder them from doing so. When Lester Piggott visited South Africa for the first time in the 1960s he rode a horse called Tokyo in the Summer Handicap. It started 33-1 with Piggott up, so one can imagine what chance it had. He ran 4th on it. That was a study in real jockeyship.

  11. Armchair jockey says:

    Sometimes SP provides comic commentary and one starts to get an insight into the thinking which applies in the industry. The trainer of Cedar Man says “Our jockey unfortunately didn’t go to the front and take the initiative”. Ian Jayes says, “Good jockeys are excellent judges of pace” but then immediately qualifies it with “All any jockey can do, is put the horse in the right position and make his run at the right time…”

    I am now thoroughly confused!! The armchair supporters of all things jockeyship often come online to berate those of us not afflicted by a lack of height and therefore clearly unqualified to level any criticism of jockeys. When a good horse wins we hear about the good jockeyship while when poor jockeyship applies and a good horse loses we get told to keep quiet as we have no knowledge of the matter. Muddled thinking is a feature of an echo chamber.

    But no matter, I shall now recline in my armchair and carry on punting, blissful in my ignorance! Giddy-up for the Kimberley Kanter!

  12. Patricia says:

    No not a dreadful ride by Lerena maybe just crappy instructions from the trainer.

  13. Rian says:

    Dont think it was Crappy instructions, lets leave to the Stipes..
    Imagine all the hard luck stories between owners ,Trainers and Jocks among the other runners

  14. hilton witz says:

    If trainers want a pace in a race then put a pacemaker in to guarantee a hot pace ..there were 9 horses in the race of 14 that had gross ratings of 75 or less so that shows you the lack of quality the derby had plus how many had been that distance before so were not sure of staying 2400m …Now days its so easy to just blame it on the jockey as in years gone by the trainer would stand by the jockey and not criticize him in public but then again gone are the days of marcus brown ,puller pk and millard coetzee they dont exist anymore..Also surely when you engage a champion jockey like Gavin to ride you dont give instructions just tell him the horses quirks and leave it to him as im sure he would have studied the race beforehand and had an idea how it would pan out.

  15. Devan Govender says:

    The problem is with most races when they are run at a slow pace in my opinion, the trainers and the jockeys are to be blamed, because if you elect to take your mount at a slow place knowing that it has a good burst in the last 200 to 300 meters before the finishing post,you as the jockey should take the initiative to get your mount in a handy position,to give your horse a fair chance of atleast finishing in the money ,or even winning. As a ardent racing enthusiast and punter, after watching numerous ‘re runs and races ,especially locally, alot of the jockeys are afraid to do their own thing in the race, because of the strict instructions that are dished out by the trainers, especially in big races,like grade 1’s and other feature races.

    It really is a tough one to label anyone, but if you look at the top jockeys riding styled and pace judgement, especially Pierre Strydom and Anton Marcus,they always give their mounts a fighting chance,even if they are not good enough to win!I suppose it boils down to the race itself and how the jockey perceives what to do, bearing in mind the instructions that he has to obey as per the trainers,or make a quick desicion and hope that it pans out,if things don’t go as planned, which very often happens.

    It all once again boils down to experience, and knowing the horse in some instances and make quick desicions in the race by the jockey and hoping all goes smooth,and then everyone is happy,including the punters aswell.

  16. Patrician says:

    When a trainer tells you to sit off the pace and the horse has a short run in so don’t make your move too soon – do you as a jockey use initiative and go to the front if the pace is non existent OR do you ride as per instructions given. If initiative is used and you are beaten what are the repercussions ?? Long story short DON’T give instructions to top jockeys who study form and have a plan A and plan B of their own.

  17. That’s right Devan & Patrician.

    And for the sake of the jocks burning bridges with trainers for the possibility of future rides, they will remain reticent about the instructions received.

  18. Ian Jayes says:

    In reply to Armchair Jockey: It is a jockey’s judgement of pace that determines where he places his mount in a race and when he makes his run.

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